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Anchor Distilling makes three unique rye whiskies in a tiny corner of a big brewery in Potrero Hill in San Francisco. I visited, probably for my 6th time, to learn the story of how it all started and how the whiskies are made. Read more →

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Anchor Distilling currently has just three tiny stills in one corner of the large brewery on Potrero Hill in San Francisco. Two of them make their rye whiskeys and Genevieve. The other one makes Junipero gin and Hophead vodka. In this post we'll look at the history and production of the spirits produced in one of the stills at Anchor. Read more →

Get Camper's Book: Tonic Water AKA G&T WTF.


Cocktail napkins have long served as the unofficial medium for spontaneous brilliance. From award winning films to Fortune 500 companies, some of the world’s boldest ideas have unfolded on a bar napkin. To help celebrate this phenomenon, Tuaca Liqueur is inviting artists of all types to share what ignites their creativity on what is arguably the perfect canvas for serendipitous inspiration. The idea is simple: Draw, doodle or illustrate whatever it is that inspires you on a 5x5 cocktail napkin. Once completed, snap a photo of your creation and upload it to a virtual gallery at Tuacaart.com for a chance... Read more →

Get Camper's Book: Tonic Water AKA G&T WTF.


This post is part of a mini-project looking at sweet and sour elements in cocktails, sponsored by PAMA Pomegranate Liqueur. I'm rounding up some thoughts and conclusions for this mini project on sweetness and sourness in cocktails, and proposing some ideas for future study. In this project we looked at: A look at basic tastes including receptors on the tongue for sweet and sour. How sweetness is an innate craving and how that makes us seek it out in our food and drink. Understanding sourness and how we measure acidity using pH. Rounding up the lime-to-sugar aka the sour-to-sweet ratio... Read more →

Get Camper's Book: Tonic Water AKA G&T WTF.


This post is part of a mini-project looking at sweet and sour elements in cocktails, sponsored by PAMA Pomegranate Liqueur. In recent years, bartenders have discovered that lime juice for cocktails tastes best not when it is first squeezed, but several hours afterward, typically something like 4-6 hours old. I believe it was Dave Arnold who first discovered this. He was testing whether limes juiced in a machine versus hand-squeezed were better (hand-squeezed won), and also found that 4-hour-old juice from both squeezing methods tasted better than fresh lime juice from either method; a fascinating and completely non-intuitive bonus. Since... Read more →

Get Camper's Book: Tonic Water AKA G&T WTF.